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100 Years and 100 Blog Posts

The 100th blog post, what to do? 100 years in business, 100 blog posts, several papers, and technical articles along the way. Communication has changed from a switchboard phone to a handheld personal computer that can receive this message. From the proving ring to today's deadweight calibrating machines, calibration technology has also changed over the years. Lots of history, lots of learning, lots of education, lots of false starts, some abandoned, some quite successful, others not so much, and so much gratitude to all.

Many of you have been with Morehouse for years, maybe decades, and all I can say is that you have enriched our lives. From past employees, owners, and customers, you all have shaped who we are today, and for that, I thank you. Thank you for your hard work, your mistakes that created headaches, those headaches that helped us learn and become better, your trust, and your help in making us always want to be better.

So, for our 100th post, I thank you all. May we continue this journey together, and as for the ups and downs; you all have played a part in this journey, and we look forward to continuing it. Below is a list of some of my favorite blog posts followed by pictures of our history over the last 100 years.

Converting an mV/V load cell signal into Engineering Units: Why this may be the most accurate and cost-effective way to use a calibration curve.


Load cell calibration: What does “Traceable to NIST” really mean?


Making a statement of compliance: The three main reasons calibration laboratories fail to get things right


Measurement Risk - What you need to know about your calibration provider. You may not be getting what you really need!


The Top 5 costly calibration mistakes for force measurements


Top3 ASTM E74 Load Cell Calibrations Mistakes 


WHY A 4:1 T.U.R. IS NOT ENOUGH: THE IMPORTANCE OF ANALYZING THE PROBABILITY OF FALSE ACCEPT RISK


Without the Right Adapters a Force Calibration Technician is Nothing Short of Being Called a Miracle Worker


Using Mass Weights to Calibrate Force Devices Can Result in a Large Measurement Error


100 Years and Some Interesting Pictures




Morehouse Springiness Tester circa 1920's I believe about a dozen were sold.



1927 Morehouse Brick Tester... What could have been our foray into the testing industry?  There wasn't much of a market there :)


Instead, circa 1930's we decided to make and refine the greatest force instrument to calibrate testing machines.  

And by the 1950s, what would be used to calibrate the Proving Rings, Morehouse Deadweight Machines, of course?



The 1960s brought the Unipour, which sold maybe 1 unit.  The rumor was that the person who tested it was too short, and it failed.